Intent:

Writing is a crucial part of the curriculum at Elsecar Holy Trinity. Our core objective is to foster a love of writing and to be able to express their thoughts and ideas with clarity and creativity through the use of a wide vocabulary informed by high-quality reading texts and bespoke strategies. We also intend to create writers who can re-read, edit and improve their own writing, and confidently use the essential skills of grammar, punctuation and spelling. We set high expectations for all our children to take pride in their work and have a fluent, cursive handwriting style alongside allowing their imaginations to flourish.

Implementation:

In order to help us to develop confident, enthusiastic writers who can express themselves with confidence and strong vocabulary, we develop very close links between writing, reading and our wider curriculum. This provides our children with regular opportunities to write in a range of styles and for a range of purposes and audiences. Writing tasks are specific and meaningful, and often meet a purpose to engage children and to illustrate how their writing skills can be applied to real life contexts.

Talk 4 Writing:

Our approach to teaching writing is through clear, structured, daily Literacy lessons which foster the principles of Talk 4 Writing.  Talk for Writing is based on how children learn. It places the learner, through formative assessment, at the heart of the planning, teaching and learning process. The term Talk for Writing not only describes all the talk that surrounds

the teaching of writing but also the wider learning within a unit. It helps the children become better speakers, listeners, readers, writers and thinkers. It includes the way in which an effective teacher thinks aloud, articulating thought processes as well as demonstrating readerly and writerly approaches. The children are engaged in talking through ideas and refining their spoken and written expression. By involving them in explaining to others, it enables the children to develop their understanding of’ whatever is being studied. And, of course, in the process it improves the children’s reading: the more familiar you become with the tune of a text, the easier it is to read that sort of text because the generic language patterns have been internalised.

 

Teachers use engaging texts, written by many well known authors as well as producing their own examples of high level and objective specific texts, and topics to inspire their writing. Over the course of 2-3 weeks, dependent on the text type, teacher break their literacy unit into three phases: the imitation phase, the innovation phase and the independent application phase.

Imitation phase:

In each lesson, the teaching of vocabulary, grammar, punctuation, speaking and listening objectives are interwoven so that children have the opportunity to learn these features in context.

Innovation phase:

Independent application phase:

All lessons build up to a piece of Independent Writing at the end of a unit of work. This enables teachers to assess the children’s writing and inform future teaching needs. Children are given time to plan, draft, edit and improve their written work, using feedback from teachers and peers to support them.

Spellings:

Children learn spellings at home each week and these are tested in school.  Spelling rules are taught explicitly at least once per week.

Handwriting:

Impact:

The impact of our writing curriculum is sustained progress, learning and transferrable skills across all subjects and disciplines for our children.  With the implementation of the writing journey being well established and taught consistently and thoroughly in both key stages, children are confident writers. By the time they are in upper Key Stage 2, most genres of writing are familiar to them and teaching can focus on creativity, writer’s craft, sustained writing and manipulation of grammar and punctuation skills to suit purpose, organisation and audience. By the end of Year Six, children will be able to write clearly, accurately and adapt their language and style appropriately. Our pupils will acquire a wide vocabulary and have a strong command of the written word. Most importantly, they will develop a love of writing and be well equipped for the rest of their education.

Talk for Writing is based on how children learn. It places the learner, through formative assessment, at the heart of the planning, teaching and learning process. The term Talk for Writing not only describes all the talk that surrounds the teaching of writing but also the wider learning within a unit. It helps the children become better speakers, listeners, readers, writers and thinkers. It includes the way in which an effective teacher thinks aloud, articulating thought processes as well as demonstrating readerly and writerly approaches. The children are engaged in talking through ideas and refining their spoken and written expression. By involving them in explaining to others, it enables the children to develop their understanding of’ whatever is being studied. And, of course, in the process it improves the children’s reading: the more familiar you become with the tune of a text, the easier it is to read that sort of text because the generic language patterns have been internalised.